The World

The world of Where Dead Gods Lie Buried is dominated by two rivers – the Jossil and the Vedis. The Jossil runs south through a wide valley, once rich and fertile, dominated by the city of Catua the Golden, home of art, culture and civilised values. But for the past fourteen years, it has been a battleground, fought over like a corpse claimed by savage scavengers. Mercenary bands march hither and thither; towns burn, bodies rot, two rival leaders stare at each other from the ramparts of their respective fortresses.

East of the Jossil, the mountains rise up and the going becomes wild. There, the bandits of Lantim hold sway, all the way to the pirate city of Ghostport. From there the vast Eastern Ocean stretches to the dawn. Rumours of lands beyond the sunrise abound but nobody knows the truth.

South of Ghostport is the Island of Hovin, on the western half of which is built a crowded and labyrinthine convent, separated from the eastern side by a wall beyond which is said to lie madness and horror. The nuns keep a steady vigil, on watch for Incursions.

To the west, the river Vedis runs through the city of Sondim, home of metalworkers and factories, merchants and organised criminals. South of Sondim is the town of Avedis, known as the Whore of Cities for its willingness to sell itself to anybody, provided the price is right. It is home to the Thousand Steps, a collection of temples clustered on a hillside, havens for dozens of refugee gods driven from the Jossil Valley by the never-ending war.

West of the Vedis lie the lands of the Commonwealth. Once a cauldron of rivalries and bloodshed, the cities overcame their quarrels and formed a unified state, governed by councils and administered by secret committees, all designed to ensure stability and peace – at a price. The Commonwealth favours science over sorcery and rationalism over superstition. It glances warily at the Jossil Valley, seeing there a memory of its own bloody past – and fears what might happen if the war were to surge westward.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: